State of The Microcredit Summit Campaign Report Archives

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Downloadable PDFs of Additional Campaign Reports

Institutional Action Plan Summary for Practitioners and Network Organizations in Developing Countries

Members of the Microcredit Summit Council Practitioners agreed to complete an Institutional Action Plan outlining how their institution will contribute to fulfilling the Summit’s goal of reaching 100 million of the world’s poorest families, especially the women of those families, with credit for self-employment and other financial and business services by the year 2005. We ask that each institution complete this form by February 2, 1997, or within one year of joining the council, and update and re-submit this form each year.

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Institutions that Submitted a 2004 Action Plan

Association for Enterprise Opportunity, USA Consortium Alafia ñ Togo Credit and Development Forum (CDF), Bangladesh Development Education Group, Cameroon Fonkoze Development Fund, USA Foundation for Women, USA Global Partnerships, USA Grameen Foundation USA Imp-Act Institute of Development Studies, United Kingdom Inyeneobot International Agency, Nigeria Jakartawalas Assistance Programme, Pakistan Joint Consultative Committee, Namibia Malawi Enterprise Zone Associations, Malawi Messagers De Paix, Kenya PIALLA ñ UN Global Compact Agency, Australia Population Coalition, USA Regroupement des Institutions du SystËme de FinancËment Decentralise du Congo, D.R. of Congo RESULTS Australia RESULTS Canada Sifra: Microfinance Network Facilitators, Belgium Simply Budgeting, USA Women Emancipation and Empowering Group, Ghana

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Practitioners and Network Organizations in Industrialized Countries

Members of the Microcredit Summit Councils of Practitioners agreed to complete an Institutional Action Plan outlining how their institution will contribute to fulfilling the Summit’s goal of reaching 100 million of the world’s poorest families, especially the women of those families, with credit for self-employment and other financial and business services by the year 2005. We ask that each institution complete this form by February 2, 1997, or within one year of joining the council, and update and re-submit this form each year.

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Foundations and Philanthropists

Members of the Microcredit Summit Councils of Foundations and Philanthropists agreed to complete an Institutional Action Plan outlining how their institution will contribute to fulfilling the Summit’s goal of reaching 100 million of the world’s poorest families, especially the women of those families, with credit for self-employment and other financial and business services by the year 2005. While the February 1997 Summit was not a pledging conference, plans are necessary if progress is to be made

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Educational Institutions

Please answer the appropriate questions below keeping in mind the major themes of the Summit (e.g., reaching the poorest1 , especially women; institutional sustainability; measurable impact; etc.). It is not expected that every institution will undertake all of these activities. Please type or print legibly.

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Corporations

Please answer the appropriate questions below keeping in mind the major themes of the Summit (e.g., reaching the poorest1 , especially women; institutional sustainability; measurable impact; etc.). It is not expected that every institution will undertake all of these activities. Please type or print legibly.

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Beyond ‘Ethical’ Financial Services: Developing a Seal of Excellence for Poverty Outreach and Transformation in Microfinance

The goal of the proposed Seal of Excellence for Poverty Outreach and Transformation in Microfinance is a microfinance sector that is responsible, genuinely inclusive (including the poor, the bottom 30-40% of the population) and contributing to positive change. The Seal would add value to existing initiatives in social performance by supporting recognition of MFIs which combine financial sustainability and responsible practices with, in the first place, significant poverty outreach and secondly a strategic approach to poverty reduction and transformation. This Seal of Excellence would be for MFIs, investors and other funders whose mission is for financial inclusion that includes the poor, and the delivery of financial and supporting services that effectively contribute to poverty reduction and transformation. This draft concept document sets out the rationale for the Seal, reviews related experiences in developing certifications in other fields (such as NGOs, fair trade, impact investing, sustainable agriculture), profiles other initiatives around financial and social performance in microfinance, shows what this Seal adds and how it fits, and maps out a process for taking this initiative forward. The idea of this Seal in microfinance is to set a vision for the sector in terms which highlight the potential of microfinance to serve the poor and to contribute to positive transformation in the lives of clients, their families and communities; and to provide a means of recognizing MFIs that are implementing this vision.

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Appendix 1

Microcredit Institutions whose figures on poorest* and total clients as of December 31, 2001 have been verified. This is the third year in which the Microcredit Summit has attempted to verify the data reported by its largest members. Practitioner institutions that submitted a 2002 Institutional Action Plan reporting more than two thousand clients were asked to provide the Campaign with the names of donor agencies, research institutions, networks or other institutions that could corroborate their data. In the letter addressed to the potential verifiers, the Secretariat defined the process as follows: “By confirm, we mean that you have visited the program, met the senior officials, reviewed aspects of the operation, they have provided you with numbers, and you believe that the institution and the numbers listed below are reliable and credible. While we understand that no one can provide absolute certainty, we would appreciate your participation in this process.” As in years gone by, the Summitís greatest challenge is bridging the gap between its commitment to reaching the poorest, and the lack of effective poverty measurement tools in use. Therefore, every use of the term ìpoorestî in these appendixes should be read within the context of this dilemma. It is anticipated that, with every successive report, the use of quality poverty measurements will increase; therefore, so too will the quality of the data reported. The data from 211 practitioner institutions was corroborated by at least one other organization. These 211 institutions reported reaching 21.8 million poorest at the end of 2001, or 81 percent of the total number of poorest clients reported. 14,056,853 (or 64.4 percent) of the 21.8 million poorest clients verified are women. * “poorest” in developing countries refers to families whose income is in the bottom 50 percent of all those living below their country’s poverty line.

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Bi-lateral and Multi-lateral Funders of Microcredit

Members of the Microcredit Summit Councils of Donor Agencies, UN Agencies, and International Financial Institutions agreed to complete an Institutional Action Plan outlining how their institution would contribute to fulfilling the Summit’s goal of reaching 100 million of the world’s poorest families, especially the women of those families, with credit for self employment and other financial and business services by the year 2005. While the February, 1997, Summit was not a pledging conference, plans are necessary if progress is to be made. We ask that each institution update and re-submit this form each year.

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Institutional Action Plan Summary for Banks and Commercial Finance Institutions

Please answer the appropriate questions below keeping in mind the major themes of the Summit (e.g., reaching the poorest1, especially women; institutional sustainability; measurable impact; etc.). It is not expected that every institution will undertake all of these activities.

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Corporate/MFI Partnerships that are Profitable for the Corporation, the MFI, and the Clients

The causes of global poverty can be broadly linked to barriers to access for health, education, employment, information, housing, human rights, clean and safe environment, and ecological stability, among others. Faced with the struggle about which issues to tackle, development agencies often take a “siloed” approach to providing aid and development resources. Too often these “siloed” approaches, whether among separate organizations or even within the same organization, do not effectively leverage operational cost structures to maximize impact, streamline processes, and reduce wasteful investment. Competing aid agencies have even been known to “carve up” the developing world which results in organizations with good intent, working against each other to the detriment of those in need. These approaches to development have created serious inefficiencies in the delivery of development services and limited success in alleviating poverty. In recent decades, private sector strategies to alleviating poverty have emerged to tackle issues of inefficiency and a need for truly sustainable solutions while providing market opportunities for business. These strategies include microcredit/microfinance, multi-national corporations targeting emerging markets, and social entrepreneurs utilizing practices to create replicable and scalable models. Many of the private sector strategies to poverty alleviation have generated great hope and, in many circumstances, measurable improvement in the alleviation of poverty. As a result, many partnerships between corporations and microfinance institutions have been developed to leverage these successes. The purpose of this paper is to present examples of how microfinance institutions, corporations, and private sector strategies can be applied to overcome the challenges of poverty alleviation. Examples from 3 corporate/MFI relationships will be provided as well as an in-depth analysis of how microfranchising, as a solution to poverty alleviation, can work and should work in concert with existing service and product platforms. These platforms include: microfinance institutions, consumer products providers, information services providers, among others. Examples will be drawn primarily from the experiences of Scojo Foundation, a leading social enterprise which utilizes a microfranchise approach to product and service distribution.

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Common questions

Is the work of the Microcredit Summit Campaign over? No, it will be continued on by RESULTS Educational Fund, the parent organization of the Microcredit Summit Campaign. RESULTS already focuses on economic empowerment as one key pillar for ending poverty and will expand its focus on how financial services can play a key role. RESULTS will be reassessing how that agenda is carried out and identify other RESULTS departments to take the lead on various workstreams. As we do this, we will be looking for new sources of funding and a business model.

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